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My Ignite Day 3 Experience

Erik Dempsey Erik Dempsey  |  
Oct 03, 2016
 
I wanted to continue my series by talking about things that I have learned.  

Events like this are great places to hear first-time announcements.   They are also to dig deeper into topics that you may already know as the conference provides you an opportunity to grow your skill and knowledge in that area.  So today’s blog will contain both announcements that I have heard so far as well as new things I learned about existing services that maybe are new to the reader as well. I wanted to continue my series by talking about things that I have learned.
First, one announcement that I didn’t touch on yesterday was the partnership between Microsoft and Adobe.  This is huge.  Adobe has committed to move all of their cloud hosted Software as a Service (SaaS) offerings to Microsoft Azure.  This means that some of the best applications like Creative Cloud are now going to be hosted on the world’s best cloud provider.  (Yes….I think Microsoft Azure is the best cloud provider, I am writing this at Ignite so are you really that surprised?).

Another announcement is the inclusion of Yammer into Office 365 groups.  This is one of those “well that makes sense” moves for Microsoft.  We have started using Office 365 groups at Skyline.  They provide a great set of features for team and project collaboration, so the inclusion of Yammer just makes sense.  Now, along with the OneNote notebook, email address, SharePoint site, you also will get a Yammer group for threaded discussions.

For those that are looking at using or already are using Skype for Business Cloud PBX, I found out that within the next 3-6 months we will start to see Auto-Attendant and Call Queues added to the service.  Then later next year, they will add custom call queuing and IVR capabilities to the service.  These enhancements will open this service to more and more organizations that use and require these types of features.

On the showcase floor, I spent some time at the Exchange booth to discuss a situation we are having with a customer that requires the ability to retain all email for 10 years whether the mailbox is active or deleted.  The MS engineer showed me the enhancements that are already being rolled out in the new-ish Office 365 Compliance center.  I say new-ish because the compliance center has been around for a while but not a lot people know about it or are using it.  The compliance center is designed to be a central place for you to apply security and information management policies to your Office 365 content such as email, OneDrive and SharePoint content.  Litigation Hold, In-place Hold and eDiscovery have been features of Exchange Online since the service was upgraded to Wave 16 or essentially Exchange 2013.  However, those features are only for management of email content.  The Compliance Center extends those features to OneDrive and SharePoint in a nice central location.

The new feature that the engineer was able to show me that is a solution for my customer is the new protection policies that can be created.  This allows us to create a single policy for email, OneDrive, SharePoint and Public folders to put a hold on that content for a specified amount of time.  So rather than having multiple policies or solutions, we now have one place to set it up and manage it.

Finally, for this post, I wanted to talk about Azure Monitor.  This new service offering gives you a view into the performance and availability of not only your Azure resources but also you on-premises servers via the use of the OMS agent that can be installed on your local servers.  This is a huge step in providing a much needed service that overcomes one of the larger reasons why IT organizations are reluctant to move to the cloud.  The previous lack of good monitoring was a significant road block for some organizations that we have visited.  Now this “single pane of glass” approach to monitoring Azure resources and not just IaaS VM’s but also your PaaS resources is huge.  Here is the announcement blog with great screen shots and details on this much needed and much appreciated new service.
MicrosoftSharePointOffice 365Azure

 

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